Monday, 12 November 2012

Gear List: Woodland Deer Stalking


Last time I posted one of these Exploriment asked why I hadn't listed the gear I was to use, so here's the kit list for woodland stalking when you're the 'sport' or client. You're not likely to need a Survival Kit in the woodlands of southern England, but a first aid kit is never a bad idea, and if you do actually contact with deer, those latex disposable gloves are a must.

Annoyingly the weather has warmed up a bit in the last couple of days, but so its not really a cold-weather kit or a summer's-morn kit but somewhere in-between.

Boots: While Muckboots are ideal I've hurt my ankle so I've opted for Lundhags Ranger boots as I want a bit more support and, optimistically believe we'll be packing big beast out of the woods.

Gaiters: keep muck and water out of your boot tops. Essential.

Hat: this one has a light in it and came from a bargain supermarket. As well as its camouflaging effect a hat is essential for keeping your rounds together when emptying the rifle. You wouldn't want to drop one from the highseat.

WestWinds Arctic Smock: Windproof, amazingly breathable, waterproof enough, and as quiet as the grave.

Plus Fours: 'old's cool' I know but once you get over looking a complete dweeb [the deer dont care] these are fantastic. Get a pair you'll be surprised how utilitarian they are.

Glue: we'll come to that in a future post

Chorizio: Fatty and Spicy, just what you need to keep you going towards the end of the outing.

Double-Bastard sharp knife: I'm using my 'posh stalking knife' the Falknieven TK6

Head Torch: ZebraLight

Bushnell GPS: borrowed from HunterX

Ear Defenders: for sighting in unmoderated rifles

Binoculars: I'm loving my Eden's and warmly recommend a chest harness over a neck strap. Less than £15/$20 buys you a whole lot of comfort. Or you could make your own in an hour.

Buddhist superstitious string: cant hurt

Base layer: wicking plastic with sent suppression (actually seems to work-who knew?)

Merino wool layer X2

Neck Gaiters AKA Buffs X2: after Rifle, Glass and Knife these are pretty vital, a lot of warmth and comfort in a very small package for very little cost.

Stalking report to follow

Your pal
SBW


22 comments:

Anonymous said...

With all that clothing we can assume you don't intend on doing much up hill walking or heavy carcase dragging.....

I'm a great believer in stalking light.

Smocks are no good as they don't allow you enough access for upper body temperature control. I certainly wouldn't be chewing chorizo's either all that garlic..... man any deer within 300m will catch that on an eddy in the wind. Nothing wrong with an old fashioned Mars bar and a couple of hands full of peanuts.

An efficient sound mod and electronic ear plugs are now my choice of hearing saving. Rather than bulky earmuffs. A decent sound mod works for both me and the dog.

Still can't see the need for glue... LOL

The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Anon
Not I didn't intend to do either, twas a hunt for Muntjac in, well woodlands.

Lots of light layers for sitting in a highseat, my smock has a HOOJ opening so it vents very well and being Ventile is admirably breathable. Works well for me.

Hmm interesting point about the chorizo, although I'm not convinced yet.

Mods are the way forward, and the little square Maxpediton wallet contains.. elccy ear defenders!

Stay tuned for the glue - to say I'm pissed off about the need for it is something of a lesson in english understatement.
SBW

Anonymous said...

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Hippo said...

No hip flask?

Thinking about it, WHEN are you going to do a review of hip flasks?

I am bored with all this talk of knives and binos. If I need a sharp edge, one of the boys will hone his machete on a rock. If I need to see where I am going, I send a boy in front (not a bad idea anyway, this country is littered with landmines). Run out of malt, however, and no amount of screaming will alter the fact I will remain thirsty.

Do you know the other advantage of britches and gaiters? Apart from gaiters being pretty snake proof and the whole ensemble intimidating natives? With ordinary trousers, loosing them for a bush dump means they invariably fall around your ankles and there is the inherent risk you might give birth to a guardsman into your own trews. And even if your arse can squirt beyond the danger zone, there's still the risk yer trousers, now in the dirt and around yer ankles, will soak up natures last downpour. Britches, however, will only go down as far as the gaiters, bracing the knees and providing a stable platform from which a chap can ease springs while taking a contented swig from his HIP FLASK.

Anonymous said...

SWB

Ventile, Gortex, spandex. LOL

I have yet to find a breathable fabric that actually lets enough moisture out when your don't more than strolling on flat ground. Believe me I have tried. The best I have found is the Nomad jacket.

As for the chorizo's. Try a few simple experiments for yourself, you'll be surprised. Its the with as smoking.

There are electronic ear plugs and then there are electronic ear plugs. None of the cheap ones are worth bothering with. Your better of with foam plugs. I spent a considerable time researching the subject before taking the plunge and order the ones I have now.

I think I know what the glue is for but I'll let you make your post. Don't want to spoil a good blog opportunity.

The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Interesting, the Nomad jackets have long appealed cant say I've ever thought of them as particularly breathable, they do lack certain features that have shown up lately, if they were to update the design I'd be first in the que for one. My conversation with the owner was cut short by his adamant assertion that the first customisation i asked him about was 'impossible'. Shame.

I'm sure you're right about the leccy ear plugs, I have a pair i got for testing and they seem to work ok, but as yet I've not been through all the the ear bud options so they're not that comfy. A friend had a pair cast to his ears and reports good things
SBW



The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Hippo
Thanks for your revealing insight into emergency evacuation procedures in the bush.

I'm sorry you're bored of knives and binos, I wish I was but i cant get enough of them. In further bad news its rucksack design next. I've just put a very very good pack up for sale to finance another pack which initial testing suggests is also very good but ... well that's for another post.

In the urban environ we also send small children ahead to clear the way, many's the time I've used the words "my kids going to be sick" to facilitate swift access to essencial servies and exits. NEVER FAILS.

SBW

The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Anon

Really glad you like the site so much, you're most welcome and may i say you're not sounding as pompous as usual. welcome aboard.

SBW

Exploriment said...

Hey that's me!

See that's what I'm talking about.

I may have missed it, but what's the little Maxpedition pouch all about.

I have contemplated something like pants that only go down a bit below the knees. If you're wearing them with gaiters, makes sense. I was looking around on a site over there the other day, clothes for the refined country gentleman, and they referred to them as breeks. Don't know if it's the same thing or not.

Anonymous said...

Sbw
I suppose it all depends on what you define as "breathable". For me its, keeps the rain out and lets the body generated moisture out so that it doesn't collect on the drop lining of the jacket or the outer shell cloth. The two different Nomad jackets I have do that superbly. I have always found the guy who owns Nomad to have his own unique style of customer service. I have always been well satisfied though. 1 off's are always a pain in the ass for any manufacturer. You can never charge the true cost of doing the "customisations". It's usually easier to just say impossible than to have to bother explaining why. You don't loose any money that way, don't have the aggro of having to confirm the alterations with the client and the factory, and don't have the worry that its not quite right when it gets delivered. "impossible" just about covers it IMO.

The problem with the budget/lower end elec earplugs is they rely upon the wrong digital technology because its cheap. You really have to be prepared to spend £500+ in order to get something that actually does more than just plug the ear canal. Good quality ear canal moulds are essential if you are needing to wear them for any length of time.

There have been some very informative discussions on some of the Benchrest and Target shooting forums in recent years regarding the development of elec plugs specifically designed for shooting, rather than having adaptations of plugs designed for general high noise environments.

The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Exploriment

Ha ha yeah its you, and yes they are known as Breeks - which north of the border is their word for trousers.

As far as i've learned, they come in two lengths Plus Two and Plus Four, the Two and Four bit being inches below the knee. Mine are Plus Fours and should be made of a rugged Tweed but are Moleskin.

Nomad make badass pairs in their supposedly in house fleece and a Stealth Tweed. Nice kit. The Bambi Basher has a pair and rates them highly.


SBW

Anonymous said...

swb

"Hippo
Thanks for your revealing insight into emergency evacuation procedures in the bush."

I agree. I suppose its one of those recessive behavioural aspects that the white man suffers when they start going native.

Personally I have never had a problem either in long pants or in plus's. Its all in the technique. Like riding a bike it's once learned never forgotten.

Anonymous said...

"Nomad make badass pairs in their supposedly in house fleece and a Stealth Tweed. Nice kit. The Bambi Basher has a pair and rates them highly."

As do I.

The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Anon

Err yess, I must have got the wrong end of the stick, when perusing Nomad's terrible website i read

"we also offer a custom made service - please contact us either directly or at a show or exhibition and we will be very happy to accommodate your requirements."

Sadly neither 'very happy' or accommodating were available the afternoon I took them up on their kind offer.

In the interests of fairness i did have a very pleasant chat with a distinguished looking gent who was part of the enterprise, sadly it was cut short before i could place an order by the appearance of Dr No.

Do you know where they buy the fleece and stealth tweed from? Their are so many mods that I'd probably be better starting from scratch.
SBW

Hippo said...

"Anonymous said...
swb

"Hippo
Thanks for your revealing insight into emergency evacuation procedures in the bush."

I agree. I suppose its one of those recessive behavioural aspects that the white man suffers when they start going native.

Bye bye, Sten

Moel said...

Hi SBW

Have you tried yeti gaiters with your boots/plus 4 combination?
Despite a bit of retro naffness (think 90's man), they do the trick here in wet north Wales.
Can even get them for less than £20 as surplus these days (fewer tears when you have a 'oh that barbed wire' moment!

Regards and look forward to hearing about your hunting.

Moel

LSP said...

Good luck on the Deer, Bushwacker. What rifle?

All best for Thanksgiving.

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Shooter said...

wheres the competition you mentioned?

The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Shooter
You won it, where's the book review you have to write as your prize?
SBW

Shooter said...

how did i win? what did i do to win ? What was the competition?

The Suburban Bushwacker said...

Shooter
You won by providing entertainment and services to the cause of blogging. Your prize is you get to review that book.
SBW